Category Archives: Dental Bonding

yellow bonding

My daughter had bonding done to cover some discoloration. Now her two front teeth are yellow. Why is that?

Richie B.- Ohio

Richie,

The dentist decides on the coloring for the dental bonding, so they’ve made the composite into a yellowish color.  Generally, you would discuss things like color ahead of time.  I’d ask your dentist to re-do the bonding, being specific about what you’re looking for in the color.

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Will Snap-On Smile work for my daughter?

My daughter is ten years old and she chipped her front teeth. I was thinking I would wait until she is older before I get these teeth fixed. But I was wondering if Snap-On Smile would work until we moved forward with a permanent fix?

Thanks,

– Gina from Ohio

Gina,

Ten years old is a tricky age because your daughter likely has a mix of permanent teeth and she probably still has some baby teeth. The baby teeth she still has may be a little loose too and her permanent teeth are in the process of erupting. The main issue with choosing the Snap-On Smile for your daughter is the fact that the appliance needs to snap onto her existing teeth. And since her teeth are in such a transitional stage, it isn’t going to work very well.

Dental bonding is safe for children and would be a solution to take care of the chipped teeth. You just need to make sure that she is old enough and willing to sit in a dental chair during the procedure.

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Related posts: pediatric dentist

Will Snap-On Smile work for my son?

Hello,

My son is eight years old and he has chipped his tooth pretty badly. It’s almost broken in half. The dentist filled it, but it broke within a week. It doesn’t seem to hurt him since the roots are unharmed. We’ve been told that he isn’t old enough to have his tooth capped. Will the Snap-On Smile work for him?

– Maya from Indiana

Maya,
Snap-On Smile works well to temporarily give the appearance of a straight, white smile. In the particular case of your son, I’m not sure this is the way to go.

If his tooth is broken, then placing this Snap-On Smile appliance over his tooth is doing nothing to address the real problem. Direct dental bonding with porcelain or composite materials can fix this problem for your son. And it needs to be done correctly so that it does not interfere with his biting or chewing. Although, you will need to seek the talents of a true cosmetic dentist. Not just any family dentist will be able to do this kind of work well.

There are some other issues to choosing Snap-On Smile for your son. Not only will it feel bulky, a boy his age may lose it. Also, he has a combination of permanent and baby teeth. This means that fitting the appliance correctly will be difficult since his bite is changing so rapidly. The appliance itself may also get in the way of new teeth that are erupting.

The reason the repair you mentioned failed is likely due to the fact that it got in the way of his bite. When he is a bit older, he will have all his permanent teeth and this will be less of an issue. It is difficult to make anymore recommendations without actually seeing this particular case. Therefore, I highly recommend consulting with an expert cosmetic dentist to present your options to you.

The tooth will look and function normally if it is done correctly.

Best of luck to you.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: emergency dentist

Will my daughter’s splotched teeth be covered with insurance?

Hello,

My daughter recently had her braces off and now her teeth have splotches on them. She was born with less than normal tooth enamel. So I was wondering if my dental insurance will pay for this?

Thanks,

– Teri in Nebraska

Teri,

If her teeth didn’t have the splotches before braces, then the damage is probably due to a lack of good brushing while the braces were in place. When you wear braces it is good to keep a toothbrush with you at all times because of the importance of keeping your teeth clean after every meal. Otherwise, the enamel can become damaged.

Since you mentioned that your daughter’s tooth enamel was damaged before braces then your dental insurance should be under some obligation.

Although, the insurance carrier is only liable to repair physical damage to the teeth. So I wouldn’t think of it as them covering it, because that usually means they will pay for the whole procedure. It is much more likely that they will help you pay for the repair to your daughter’s teeth. Your insurance is only committed to making the repair functionally sound. And my guess is you want the teeth to look beautiful in addition to being functional.

For beautiful results, you need an expert cosmetic dentist. Not just any family, general dentist will be able to do this kind of cosmetic work well. Cosmetic dentistry requires extensive training beyond dental school. It may be more expensive to get the results you want but when done well, it will be well worth it.

Dental bonding or porcelain veneers are options that would work to repair the splotches.

I hope this information was helpful.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: Lumineers, Invisalign

My child’s broken tooth

I feel so bad for my nine year old daughter. Yesterday, she fell down and broke one of her front teeth. Also, I just noticed a horizontal crack in another one. When I took her to the dentist, they didn’t seem concerned. Basically I was told that he doesn’t have the availability right now to take care of it. He said it should be fine for three months and needs that time to desensitize. Have you heard of this waiting period? I really want her to have it fixed as soon as possible.

Thanks for your time.

– Kendra from Arizona

Kendra,

If it is your desire to have this taken care of immediately, there is really no reason to wait. It would be ideal if you still have the broken piece of the tooth. If you find a cosmetic dentist that has an artistic eye, the tooth will actually be able to be reattached.

Please do your homework though and don’t go to just any dentist. Make sure the dentist is passionate about cosmetic dentistry and has undergone the additional training beyond dental school. From what you have described, the location of your daughter’s tooth is quite prominent and it will be important the the dentist is experienced.

Dental bonding will work to restore the look of the tooth if you don’t have the piece that has come off. As time goes by and your daughter gets older, the pulp in the tooth will be smaller. At that time, a single crown may be more appropriate based on damage that has been done.

Best of luck!

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related links: emergency dentist, pediatric dentist

Flouride stains on teeth

My little boy has spots on his teeth. They are brown in color and are from fluoride. He has had his teeth bleached by a local dentist to try and get rid of them. But it did not work. The brown stains are still there. Now the dentist is recommending porcelain veneers. Can you tell me how much more expensive veneers are than dental bonding?

– Laura from Florida

Laura,

Unfortunately, I think it’s time to find a new dentist. Brown fluoride stains will not be remedied by teeth whitening or bleaching, which you are now aware of.

Dental bonding is a possibility. But it all depends on how bad the staining is. It is imperative that you research an expert cosmetic dentist. Tooth bonding takes artistic talent and not every dentist can do it well.

Porcelain veneers tend to be a more expensive treatment but will give the best results. Pricing varies from dentist to dentist, so you will have to discuss cost comparison with the dentist you choose. Again, I would urge you to have a consultation with a cosmetic dentist that has trained with the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry. An AACD dentist should be able to provide you with the best recommendation and cost based on your specific circumstance.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

What do you recommend for a chipped tooth?

I have a chipped front tooth and I am trying to figure out what is better, dental bonding or a porcelain crown? I have done a lot of research about tooth bonding and my general dentist has told me that the bond won’t hold over time. She has recommended a porcelain crown to fix my chip. Can my chipped front tooth actually be corrected with dental bonding if I’m diligent in caring for it?

Thanks, Viv from Massachusetts

Dear Viv,

It turns out that many dentists are uncomfortable with direct bonding techniques. They will try to discourage you from this treatment. Although, it does hold up well and in most cases would be a good choice. There are likely several reasons for your dentist to recommend a crown. She may not have much experience with bonding. It requires artistic talent to do a good job. She may not carry all of the shades, textures, and varieties of bonding materials. Many general dentists only have a limited inventory of all-purpose bonding composites and do not have specialized bonding materials in stock. A cosmetic dentist will have the highly customized materials available that can make your tooth beautiful and will be long-lasting. Another reason she may recommend the crown is due to the higher cost of the bonding. Still another reason is that you may have an unusual bite that could potentially break off the bond, in which case the porcelain crown truly is best. It’s always good to get a second opinion. I would research an expert cosmetic dentist in your area. Good luck!

More information to fix a chip, read about porcelain veneers or CEREC crowns.