Category Archives: Teeth Whitening

Can I bleach my teeth with clorox?

I’ve been using whitening toothpaste for months now and my teeth are no whiter. I really want to whiten my teeth, so I’m wondering if I can use my bleach at home, like Clorox?

Anthony P.- Miami, FL

Anthony,

The ingredient that dentists use to whiten your teeth is not bleach. Bleach will actually poison you, so under no circumstances should you use Clorox. In small amounts, bleach can remove moisture from your teeth. That will cause them to weaken and become brittle. Small amounts also causes vomiting and stomach irritation. Larger amounts act as a poison causing heart issues, shock, and death.

The whitening toothpastes cannot do a deep whitening, like you can get from your dentist’s office. The most it can do is remove surface stains. If your stains are below the surface you will not be satisfied with anything but professional results.

My suggestion is that you go to your dentist and ask for professional teeth whitening. The gel they use will oxidize  your teeth from the inside out, eliminating all your stains and giving you a bright, white smile.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper.

Review of Luster White Premium At Home Teeth Whitening

Luster White Premium is advertised as an at-home type of Zoom Whitening. Does it really work?  Your teeth will get whiter….for a while, then the whitening will fade away. Rather than the whitening coming from a bleaching agent that whitens your teeth from the inside out as you get with professional teeth whitening, Luster White has a pigment in the “super whitener”–zinc oxide– that sticks to your teeth and makes them look whiter. This is  only temporary. The light that come with the kit does nothing and seems to only be psychological in nature.

My opinion is that it is a waste of money. If you’re determined to do an over-the-counter kit instead of professional teeth whitening, than I’d suggest Crest Whitestrips. They will whiten your teeth, though it will take significantly longer than it would if you went through a dentist.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper.

A more affordable treatment

I am looking for ways to make my dental care more affordable and I was wondering if dental bonding will save me money over porcelain veneers?

My teeth are very yellow even though I brush my teeth after every meal. It seems that you can see through the ends of my two front teeth. I’m unhappy with my smile but I don’t want it to look fake.

After the research I’ve done, I don’t think I want to have porcelain veneers done. They seem like they may not look natural and they are extremely expensive. I guess I’m wondering if simply whitening my teeth will work or if tooth bonding is a better choice for me. Or maybe I should get the bleaching done first and then the bonding? I don’t want to spend a lot of money and then have my teeth turn yellow again either. Can you explain how bonding works and let me know your thoughts.

Thanks,

– Tanya from Florida

Tanya,

After hearing your case, I don’t think dental bonding is the alternative that is right for you just because you are looking to save money on porcelain veneers. Teeth whitening sounds like the best solution from what you have described. This is because good dental bonding will end up costing almost as much as veneers and it won’t last as long. In fact it would probably only last about one-tenth as long as veneers.

Teeth bleaching will take care of the yellow color of your teeth and they will not return to their original color. Your teeth will pick up stains as time passes, but you can always do some touch up bleaching to keep your white new smile.

This post is sponsored by Glibert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: affordable dentistry

Can my dental bonding work be whitened?

I was wondering if it is possible to whiten teeth that have been bonded? I have dental bonding work on my front teeth which is pretty old. It was probably done close to 14 years ago now and I guess I should probably have it replaced but I can’t afford that right now. From what I have heard, the bonding doesn’t change color with teeth whitening. Is that correct, if I use bleaching will the bond be returned to its original color?

– Ted from New Jersey

Ted,

Teeth bleaching will not make your dental bonding any whiter and unfortunately it may make it look worse. What happens is the teeth whitening procedure will actually whitens your non-bonded, natural teeth. But, the bond will remain unaffected. This means that your teeth will appear to be two different colors.

Polishing may improve the look of your dental bonding. That is as long as the discoloring has occurred from surface stains and not from the bonding materiel itself. You can meet with a cosmetic dentist to see if polishing will work for your case.

Other than that, you may need to have the bonding replaced to get your desired look.

It is important to visit a true cosmetic dentist. Don’t compromise on quality or fall for a deal that sounds too good to be true. If it is not in the budget right now, start saving and have it done the right way.

Hopefully this information was helpful to you.

This post was provided by Gilbert dentist 16th Street Dental Care.

Pain with teeth whitening

Hi there. I just started an in-home teeth whitening system. I have been using it for about two weeks now and haven’t had any issues. Except yesterday when I used them I had a sharp pain. It was on my front tooth and seemed very intense for about thirty seconds or so. I have a dental bond on this tooth that was orginally chipped and then reapaired over a decade ago. So I was wondering if this reaction means that my bond is going bad or nearing the end of its lifecycle? Or could the whitening treatments I’m using be weakening the dental bond? That is my guess. Thank you for your help.

-Jane from Texas

Jane,

It is unlikely that the bond was weakened by the teeth whitening system you are using. The common bleaching gel has not been known to weaken dental bonds. Also, if that was actually the case and the bond was weakened then it would mean that the repaired chip would most likely fall off. This would probably be causing much more pain.

The way you have described it, I think the bleaching agent may be irritating a sensitive part of the tooth. If the tooth was injured previously and repaired, there may be a senstive area that has become exposed due to some of the bonding agent that has wore off.

Your situation is a good example of why with any teeth bleaching treatment, it is important to consult and remain under a dentist’s professional supervision. My assumption is that you are working with a dentist. So, you should let your dentist know about your problem. Hopefully, they will be able to pin point the issue you’re having. If it turns out to be a sensitive spot then there are solutions to re-coat the area. You should be able to continue bleaching safely once this issue has been resolved. Make sure you get this checked out before continuing with your bleaching treatment.