Tag Archives: affordable dentist

Will an Emergency Dentist Bill a Venue for Me?

I’m in a bind. I’m a college student who grew up in a group home. Once I turned 18 I’ve been pretty much on my own. I went on a date where we went dancing. They had a platform which we were dancing on along with a bunch of other people. Apparently too many people because it collapsed. Outside of a few bruises and realizing my date cared more about his well-being than mine, I thought I was okay. But, this morning my front teeth feel loose. I don’t have a ton of money but I don’t want to lose my teeth. Would an emergency dentist charge the venue? I don’t know if I have enough to cover this. I don’t even know what “this” is.

Corra L.

Dear Corra,

A woman grabbing her jaw in need of an emergency dentist

First, I want to express that I’m sorry you’ve had to grow up in a group home. Hopefully, you have a good group of friends that help you feel you have some back up in this world. It is important that you see an emergency dentist. In the meantime, be sure not to wiggle them. I know it’s tempting, but you risk snapping your ligaments, which will derail your efforts to save the teeth.

I’m going to start by telling what to expect when you see an emergency dentist. They’ll check the tooth along with x-raying it to make sure no damage is done to the pulp. IF the pulp is damaged, you’ll need a root canal treatment and dental crown. Because you’re talking about your front teeth, be sure they only give you all-porcelain crowns (as opposed to the metal-based crowns). They look more natural and you won’t have to worry about a gray line developing at the top of your gumline.

If the pulp is fine, they’ll just need to splint your loose teeth to some stable teeth. It may just be a matter of giving the ligaments time to heal.

Affording an Emergency Dentist

Unfortunately, the dentists will not be able to bill the venue. Dentists can only bill those receiving the service or their guardians. However, save every receipt for every scrap of money this costs you. I’m sure they’ll be a lawsuit of some kind given that people were hurt and you’ll probably get the money back.

Even though the dentist can’t bill someone else, it doesn’t mean you’re trapped and can’t get the help you need. Most dentists went into the field because they wanted to help people. In fact, there are affordable dentists who will be willing to work with you. I believe, you especially, given your unique circumstances, will find dentists compassionate.

Some have in-house payment plans. Others use Care Credit. Either way, you should be able to get the care you need and then pay it out.

This blog is brought to you by Dr. Matt Roper.

Can’t afford tooth extraction

I have an infected wisdom tooth that really needs to be extracted, but I just don’t have the money. I’m worried the infection is spreading. I’ve now got pressure along my left cheek bone leading up to my eye.  Should I see if my doctor would be willing to write me an antibiotic prescription without my coming in? My dentist won’t do it.

Brandon W.- Athens, GA


There is a  reason your dentist won’t write you a prescription, but it sounds like he didn’t explain it to you. Antibiotics will not get rid of your infection. They will merely hold the infection temporarily, but it will continue and then will be more resistant to the medicine. The reason antibiotics don’t work is they cannot get to the source of the infection.

You need a dentist to do that. If you leave the infection, it will continue to spread.  What will you do if it gets to your brain?

You’re in need of some affordable dental treatment. My recomendation to you is that you call around and explain your situation. You will probably find a dentist who is willing to work with you.  Most dentists have payment plan options. Our office even has an in-office dental plan. This will allow you to pay the fee over time.  Some are low and even no-interest plans.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper.

Will Snap-on Smile Work With Missing Teeth?

I am missing several teeth and I was wondering how many teeth are required for a Snap-on Smile?

– Dana in Texas


There are several different factors involved that will vary from person to person for a Snap-on Smile.

It is difficult to estimate an exact number of teeth required, but theoretically you may be able to support the appliance with as little as two teeth per arch. If those two teeth were angled in just a way that the Snap-on Smile was able to snap over them. The issue here is that the appliance may end up placing additional stress on these two teeth. So another factor to consider is what two teeth they are. It is difficult to provide a specific answer without having actually seen your case and knowing how many teeth you are missing.

The Snap-on Smile is a temporary solution for a straight, white smile. Depending on how many teeth you are missing, you may have other issues to deal with. When you are missing teeth your body resorbs the bone and minerals to be used elsewhere in the body. So you may have some additional shifting or even jawbone loss if you are missing a lot of teeth. Dental implants are a permanent solution to missing teeth. Or a dental bridge or partial denture may be options, again depending on what teeth you are missing.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related links: Affordable dental implants, affordable dentist

A more affordable treatment

I am looking for ways to make my dental care more affordable and I was wondering if dental bonding will save me money over porcelain veneers?

My teeth are very yellow even though I brush my teeth after every meal. It seems that you can see through the ends of my two front teeth. I’m unhappy with my smile but I don’t want it to look fake.

After the research I’ve done, I don’t think I want to have porcelain veneers done. They seem like they may not look natural and they are extremely expensive. I guess I’m wondering if simply whitening my teeth will work or if tooth bonding is a better choice for me. Or maybe I should get the bleaching done first and then the bonding? I don’t want to spend a lot of money and then have my teeth turn yellow again either. Can you explain how bonding works and let me know your thoughts.


– Tanya from Florida


After hearing your case, I don’t think dental bonding is the alternative that is right for you just because you are looking to save money on porcelain veneers. Teeth whitening sounds like the best solution from what you have described. This is because good dental bonding will end up costing almost as much as veneers and it won’t last as long. In fact it would probably only last about one-tenth as long as veneers.

Teeth bleaching will take care of the yellow color of your teeth and they will not return to their original color. Your teeth will pick up stains as time passes, but you can always do some touch up bleaching to keep your white new smile.

This post is sponsored by Glibert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: affordable dentistry

I can’t afford all the work I need done

I grew up with a difficult childhood and dental care wasn’t a regular part of my life until after high school. At 27 years old my teeth show it. My dental flipper just broke and I already have over $2o,000 in work that needs to be done. I simply can’t afford it. But I really wish there was a way to improve things. My dentist won’t work with me. I wish the crowns and bridges could somehow be reduced but he won’t budge on fees.

Do you have any recommendations or ideas? Any insight would be greatly appreciated.

– Linda from Wisconsin


I’m not aware of any special resources or an extremely affordable dentist that would provide discounts. But I do have some recommendations that you may find helpful.

Without knowing exactly what services you require it is difficult to make specific treatment recommendations. Although, from what you have described it seems as if you should be able to phase your treatment out over time. This will allow you to pay as you go which will make your dentistry more affordable.

If decay is a big issue and you have several teeth that need to be extracted, then you may be able to treat things economically. If the dentist removes the decay then the tooth can be filled as cost-effective as possible. Or if it’s a crown you need, the dentist can build up the area without actually placing the crown. Both of these options will help and will hopefully be less expensive.

Or temporary fillings can be placed to help with the decay. This isn’t a long-term strategy but the material used for these fillings contains fluoride. This will be a good base for a crown and the fluoride will help resist future decay.

As for teeth that need to be removed, a partial denture is much less expensive than dental implants or bridges.

If your dentist won’t work with you then make some calls and hopefully you can find one that will. Just be honest and upfront about your financial situation. I would explain that you have a lot of work to be done and you need to phase it out over time. Also, some dentists offer complimentary consultations where you can go in and discuss specifics and hopefully come up with a personalized plan that works for you.

Best of luck.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Related link: affordable dental implants

I have decay underneath my crown

I think I have some tooth decay located under my dental crowns. Also, I think I may need another root canal. My question is whether or not the crowns can be reused when the decay is removed from underneath the crown? I am looking for an affordable dentist to do this because I cannot afford to have all new crowns placed.

Another issue I have is that I have a sensitive gag reflex. I’m 70 years old and I’ve been told that I will also have a difficult time dentures. This is frustrating since I thought I fixed most of my dental problems with the crowns I had done several years ago now.

Any advice would be appreciated.

– Louie from California


The good news is that the decay around a dental crown can sometimes be fixed without having to remove them completely. That said, it all depends on how bad the tooth decay is and how deep it is. If it is deep then the crown will need to be removed to take care of the problem. When the crown is removed it may need to be cut off which will means it will not be reusable. But if the crown is removed and remains intact it is possible to have it redone with new material to build it up if you are conscious about budget.

To prevent future tooth decay, you may want to alter how frequently you are eating. Although brushing and flossing everyday is important, snacking throughout the day will not enable you to stay on top of the decay. It’s best to brush each time you eat if your general dental health is a concern.

I hope this information was helpful in answering your question.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Links you may be interested in: CEREC crowns, emergency dentist