Category Archives: Dental Crowns

My dentist won’t fix my bite after getting a crown!

I had to get a root canal because I broke my bottom molar in the back about a month ago eating a hard popcorn kernal.  After I got the crown, I knew immediately that it didn’t feel like my usual bite. The dentist ground it down a little, but I left that day with it still being off.  He said it would get better. I let it got for a week, but every time I would bite or clench my teeth together, they just didn’t fit. So I went back in to have him fix it, but he was really hesitant to grind much more, saying I just need to get used to “my new bite.” Does it weaken the crown to grind it down? I just can’t figure out why my dentist won’t fix how my teeth fit together.

Preston, Branson, Missouri

Dear Preston,

It’s not fun to have to get a root canal and crown, but it’s even more frustrating to have your occlusion, or bite, feel off.  Because eating is essential, it’s not like you can just avoid biting and chewing. Correcting the bite is a routine part of placing a crown. If your dentist is hesitating, it may mean that either he doesn’t know how to fix it or is uncomfortable to do so.

How dentists correct the bite on your crown

Your bite will never feel exactly the way it did with your original tooth. The dentist can shape the contour to match it as closely as possible. Dentists use a special registration paper to have you “tap tap” your teeth together. This helps them see what parts of the tooth are hitting before the other parts. They can then grind down those spots. It’s doesn’t weaken the crown to fix those small spots.

You can give yourself some more time to try to adjust to your crown. If you continue to  experience discomfort, you will need to do something. It’s not good for your jaw to have your bite off. You could try to see your dentist again, but if he was uncomfortable or not knowledgable to do it right the first time, it may not end well . You may need to see another dentist to fix it.

This post is sponsored by Vista Dorada Dental in Gilbert, AZ.

 

Can you get more than one root canal on a tooth?

I had a root canal two years ago from my dentist. I trust him and he usually does a great job. Recently, though, I have been feeling some pain on that same tooth.  I’ve been told before about pain in the teeth being projected (I think it was called) from another hurting tooth. I’m pretty sure that must be it because you can’t get a root canal twice in the same tooth, right?

Pat

Dear Pat,

toothacheThere are times when pain from a tooth is projected, or referred, from another tooth. In your case, though, it truly may be that you are feeling pain from the same tooth that had the root canal.

In most instances where a root canal is completed, the tissue, or pulp, in the tooth is completely cleaned out of the spaces and canals. Then the canals are sealed so bacteria can’t reenter. A crown is put on top and the patient goes home without another thought about the infection in the tooth.

So how come you may need another root canal?

Unfortunately, not all teeth are created equally. Most molars, for example, have three canals leading down to the roots. Every once in a while, those molars either have a fourth canal leading down or the canals are twisted and at angles that make it difficult for a dentist, even a good, competent dentist, to completely clean out the pulp. If that infected area isn’t completely cleaned out or properly sealed, it may cause pain again as infection grows. If that happens, a second or maybe even a third root canal may be necessary.

These scenarios of root canals aren’t common, but they do happen. If your pain continues, you may want to revisit your dentist to check your tooth. He may retreat it or may refer you to an endodontist, a dentist who specializes in root canal treatment.

This post is sponsored by Vista Dorada Dental in Gilbert, AZ.

 

How to tell if you need crowns

My dentist wants to replace my silver fillings in #3,4,5 with crowns. How can I tell if that is necessary?

Madeline J. from Wisconsin.

Madeline,

In dental school we are taught a few guidelines that can make a dental crown desirable.  Two of the main ones are: 1. The width of the filling: Once a filling gets to to a certain width it weakens the tooth and makes it prone to fracture. 2. There may be fracture lines showing.  Amalgam (silver) fillings tend to weaken a tooth.

Other than this it is really a judgment call on the part of your dentist. That is why it is so important to have a dentist you feel you can trust. Most dentists are trustworthy, but there are a few out there that use pressure sales tactics or try to rush you into a treatment option. If you’re feeling uncomfortable with the decision you can get a second opinion. Just make sure the second dentist doesn’t know who the first dentist is or what treatment recommendation you were giving. It is always best to get a blind second opinion.

You may also be interested in a Mercury-free dentist.

This blog is brought to you by Gilbert Dentist Dr. Matt Roper.

I have decay underneath my crown

I think I have some tooth decay located under my dental crowns. Also, I think I may need another root canal. My question is whether or not the crowns can be reused when the decay is removed from underneath the crown? I am looking for an affordable dentist to do this because I cannot afford to have all new crowns placed.

Another issue I have is that I have a sensitive gag reflex. I’m 70 years old and I’ve been told that I will also have a difficult time dentures. This is frustrating since I thought I fixed most of my dental problems with the crowns I had done several years ago now.

Any advice would be appreciated.

– Louie from California

Louie,

The good news is that the decay around a dental crown can sometimes be fixed without having to remove them completely. That said, it all depends on how bad the tooth decay is and how deep it is. If it is deep then the crown will need to be removed to take care of the problem. When the crown is removed it may need to be cut off which will means it will not be reusable. But if the crown is removed and remains intact it is possible to have it redone with new material to build it up if you are conscious about budget.

To prevent future tooth decay, you may want to alter how frequently you are eating. Although brushing and flossing everyday is important, snacking throughout the day will not enable you to stay on top of the decay. It’s best to brush each time you eat if your general dental health is a concern.

I hope this information was helpful in answering your question.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada Dental.

Links you may be interested in: CEREC crowns, emergency dentist

My crowns are ugly

Quite awhile ago, like 20 years or so, I had porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns placed on my front teeth. I hate the dark line that is evident when I smile. Do you know if anything can be done to improve their appearance or change this? I have a big smile and it really bothers me. Would Lumineers work? Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

– Carolyn in California

Carolyn,

It is possible to get that beautiful smile you are hoping for without the dark lines. For an expert cosmetic dentist, the treatment is relatively simple. A general dentist does not have the artistic ability required to make this transformation beautiful. An experienced cosmetic dentist can place crowns made of all porcelain. There is no metal in them, so they will look just like your natural teeth.

I hope this information was helpful.

This post is sponsored by Gilbert dentist Vista Dorada dental.

Related links: porcelain veneers, CEREC crowns